14
May

Which home dialysis treatment is right for me?

three-people-discussing-dialysis-treatment-options

Choosing a dialysis treatment can be overwhelming. That’s why we at Cincinnati Home Dialysis are strong advocates for treatment types that allow our patients to enjoy the most quality of life and independence they can. There are a lot of things you’ll need to consider before selecting the kidney disease treatment type that’s right for you, and we’re here to help you through this process.

30
Mar

4 ways to care for your kidneys every day

man-running-down-country-road

As National Kidney Month comes to a close, we’re reminded that taking good care of your kidneys is a daily commitment throughout the year. Your kidneys play a key role in some of your body’s most vital functions, like filtering waste. That’s why we at Cincinnati Home Dialysis strongly encourage our community to take steps now to prevent kidney decline and the onset of kidney disease. This is all the more important if you are at risk for kidney disease.

Here are four ways you can show some love to your kidneys today and every day:

18
Feb

4 Heart Health Tips for Home Dialysis Patients

 

two-heart-shaped-fruit-bowls

February is American Heart Month. This month is all about raising heart heath awareness and adopting healthy behaviors. As a home dialysis patient, maintaining your heart health is critically important: heart disease is a leading cause of death for those with kidney failure. Even if you’ve already been diagnosed with heart disease, practicing heart healthy behaviors could prevent your condition from getting worse.

19
Nov

Home Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis: What’s the Difference?

multicolor-question-marks

If you have chronic kidney disease, there are several types of dialysis that may be right for you. In general, dialysis is designed to perform similar functions that your kidney can no longer do effectively on its own. This means removing toxins and wastes from your bloodstream, maintaining your body’s chemical balance, and preventing extra water from accumulating in your body.

There are two main types of home dialysis treatment: home hemodialysis (HHD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD).

03
Jul

Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) Explained

If you’ve recently been diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), you may be feeling overwhelmed by the amount of information being thrown at you. One term you will hear frequently is GFR, or glomerular filtration rate.

Your glomerular filtration rate is an indication of how well your kidneys are working, and is used to determine your stage of kidney disease.

The test itself requires a blood sample that is sent to a lab for analysis. Your blood sample will be tested for creatinine, which is the chemical waste product of creatine. Creatine supplies energy to your muscles. You may also provide a urine sample to test for protein in your urine – an indication of kidney disease.

Your GFR will be determined using a formula that includes a combination of factors such as your creatinine levels, age, gender, height, weight, and ethnicity. A high GFR indicates a higher percentage of kidney function. The stages of chronic kidney disease are approximated to the following GFRs:

Stage 1 – 90-100% kidney function

Stage 2 – 60-89% kidney function

Stage 3a – 45-59% kidney function

Stage 3b – 30-44% kidney function

Stage 4 – 15-29% kidney function

Stage 5 – 15% or less kidney function

When your GFR is low, it indicates that your kidneys are not working as they should. Detecting kidney disease early will allow you to start treatment sooner and may help keep the disease from progressing.

After being diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, your nephrologist may order this test at regular intervals to assess the disease’s progression and plan the appropriate treatment. At Cincinnati Home Dialysis, we provide early stage treatment for chronic kidney disease. Your care team can help determine which treatment option best aligns with your lifestyle and needs.

13
May

Join Us for the 2018 Cincinnati Kidney Walk!

Cincinnati Kidney Walk 2017

From all of us at Cincinnati Home Dialysis – our team, our patients, and our community – we hope you join us at Fountain Square on Sunday, May 20th for the 2018 Cincinnati Kidney Walk!

The Kidney Walk is a rain or shine event organized by the National Kidney Foundation. Your participation in the event allows this organization to continue supporting those affected by kidney disease, from kidney donors, recipients, and families. Participants can earn prizes for raising money like a t-shirt, beach tote, fleece jacket, and personalized support from the Kidney Walk staff. The Cincinnati Kidney Walk’s fundraising goal is $130,000.

This year’s walk is expected to bring over 3,000 participants to downtown Cincinnati. There will be two routes from Fountain Square for walkers, one short (about 30 minutes) and one long (about an hour and 15 minutes). Registration for the event begins at 8:30 a.m., kickoff programming at 9:20 a.m., and walking at 10 a.m. You’ll find our Cincinnati Home Dialysis team at an exhibitor booth on the Square.

For more information about the walking routes, parking, and registration, visit the Cincinnati Kidney Walk event page. Follow along with other nationwide Kidney Walks on social media with #kidneywalk.

We hope to see you there!

04
May

Kidney Transplant: Living Donor Versus Deceased Donor

kidney-donation

There are two types of kidney transplants available, living donation and deceased donation.

Living Kidney Donation

A living donor is donating their kidney while they are still alive. One major advantage of living donation is that the transplanted kidney starts functioning in your body immediately after the surgery. This type of kidney transplant also allows you, your care team, and your donor to plan for the transplant and arrange the surgery when you and the donor are healthiest. The living donor is often an immediate family member, but could also be an extended family member or stranger as long as you have matching blood types.

If you and your family member do not have matching blood types, a paired donation may be possible. This is where two pairs of interested donors and transplant candidates “swap” kidneys. For example, Jane wants to donate a kidney to her sister Allie, but they are not compatible. Michael wants to donate a kidney to his wife Carol, but they are not compatible. However, Michael’s kidney is compatible with Allie, and Jane’s kidney is compatible with Carol. In this case, a swap can be performed between the four so a compatible kidney exchange can take place.

Deceased Kidney Donation

A deceased donor has chosen to donate their kidneys when they die. This is the most common type of kidney transplant in the US. When the donor has died, their kidneys can last up to 72 hours before transplant, so when a match is found, it is important to be ready to undergo surgery at short notice.

The wait time for a deceased kidney donation is about three to five years, but may be shorter or longer. Once the kidney is transplanted, it may take a few days or weeks to function properly, and you may need to remain on dialysis until your body and the kidney are in sync.

Talk to your care team at Cincinnati Home Dialysis about whether kidney transplant is the right option for you. We’re here to support you every step of the way.